A child is at particular risk of developing allergies if the mother, father or older siblings have or have had a medically diagnosed allergic disease. 

A child is at particular risk of developing allergies if the mother, father or older siblings have or have had a medically diagnosed allergic disease. By allergic disease, it includes diseases asthma, hay fever, atopic eczema (childhood eczema) and food allergy.

If you have a child with a special risk of developing allergies, we have some good advice for you here. Fortunately, you can prevent allergies already at the changing table. You can also help your child by creating a good indoor climate without smoke, moisture and dust.

Breastfeeding and diet

It is recommended for children to be breastfed until they are 6 months old and preferably longer.

If it is not possible or there is insufficient breast milk for your baby, then you should choose highly hydrolysed infant formula for the first 4 months. After 4 months, your baby may want to receive regular breast milk substitute.

At the earliest when your child is 4 months old, you must start with a transitional diet. However, many children thrive on breast milk / infant formula until they are 6 months old.

There is no evidence that you can prevent allergies by not giving your child certain foods, such as gluten, eggs, fish and citrus fruits.

Do not give your child cow's milk in its first year of life. However, it is not because of allergy risk, but because of increased risk of being overweight later in life.

There is no evidence that you can prevent allergies in your baby with a special diet when you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Housing and cleaning

  • Thoroughly clean at least once a week with perfume-free cleaners.
  • Wash new clothes 1-2 times before use. New clothes may contain residues of chemicals that can cause allergic reactions, rashes and skin irritation.
  • Wash your baby's sleeping animals regularly at 60 degrees to minimize the amount of house dust mites. When buying stuffed animals for bed, make sure that they can be washed at 60 degrees.
  • Do not dry clothes indoors. It can increase the humidity and thus the occurrence of house dust mites. If you have a dryer, make sure it has an outdoor vent.
  • Ventilate in all rooms three times a day for 5-10 minutes with drafts. Also air out after showering, cooking and cleaning.
  • Keep the temperature at 20 degrees indoors in the winter. It helps lower humidity and can prevent mould and house dust mites from thriving.
  • Avoid exposing your child to tobacco smoke. Smoke exacerbates asthma symptoms and increases the risk of asthmatic bronchitis, which can turn into asthma.
  • Your child should avoid daily contact with furry animals in its first year of life. Note that this recommendation is likely to be amended as recent research does not unequivocally support this.

Skin care

Choose products with minimal allergy risk, and drop completely perfumed products - including the organic ones. Natural or organic perfumes and essential oils can cause allergies, just as chemically produced perfumes can.